Overlord


D-Day, 6 June 1944. A team of paratroopers are given the mission to land behind enemy lines and blow up a powerful Nazi radio transmitter before the Allies land on the beaches of Normandy. Only four of the team survives the drop but the mission is still the critical imperative. The survivors are not prepared when they find a secret plot to reanimate the dead and create a new Nazi army in “Overlord.”


Robin's Review: B

Shortly in to this violent crime thriller, I saw direct references to Mario Puzo’s “The Godfather” with its warring Yakuza crime families, debates over dealing illegal drugs within Japan, desires to move into legitimate businesses and ruthless elimination of one’s foes. This tome, though, is by the legendary Japanese gangster film maker Takeshi Kitano and, while the story is familiar to American audiences, this is strictly a Japanese gangster film with all its trappings of mixed loyalties, vying for power and taking it by any means necessary. Be warned that this is a violent movie, even for a gangster film, and Kitano relishes in depicting his characters’ ruthlessness. Kitano plays a key role as crime family boss, Otomo, but this is a true ensemble film with the many players getting equal shrift with star Kitano. Do not expect to get the intricate machinations on the first watching of “Outrage.” With the many characters and cat and mouse power plays of the Yakuza bosses and their underlings, it will take another sitting to sort things out. But, I think it is worth the effort.